Wednesday, July 02, 2008

The new cereus blooms - 6/30/08

The cereus acquired last summer has produced its first bloom. The second of the two pictures below was taken after sunrise, with natural light. The aqua backdrop is a pool cover.





The plant is growing some new leaves, but there are no additional buds at this time.

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15 Comments:

At 12:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

aI found your web-sight last week and your information has been a great help to me. It is July 3,2008 11:35pm and finaly everyone has left my house. The event here was to watch two 10" milk white blooms open. Thet started to open at 7:30pm and the sun was still hight in the sky, and by 9:00pm were fully open to 10 inches with a smell that we could not believe. This is a very old plant, it was given to me in 2001 and was brought from th mid west around 1980. My frind had it from 1986 to 2001. It bloomed for her two times. There are 3 more blooms ready to open and I counted around 5 to 8 more coming. We were able to get some great pictures and I would love to share them with you. My e-mail address is Valleyridgeltd@aol.com and my name is Cheryl Thenks again for having a great web-sight about this wonderful plant.

 
At 11:12 AM, Blogger Kate said...

I so enjoy your website. I posted today about our 25 year old cereus that moved from the warmth of Texas to the chilly Northwest 17 years ago. It has only been in the last 2 years that we've had blooms. I finally discovered what the lighting requirements were and we are now getting buds. The first of the 2008 season opened last night and I was mesmerized after so many dry years! What a wonderful, primitive amazing plant this is! Thanks for providing so much helpful information and so many beautiful photographs on your site. I'll be visiting regularly.

 
At 7:04 PM, Blogger Toadly Cereus said...

your photos are so amazing!! I want a camera like that!! Please come see my megger phone camera shots. I thought were cool, but Yours are so amazzing!!

 
At 1:27 PM, Anonymous Denise said...

I recently enjoyed my cereus bloom with 11 blooms opening at one time! That was a new record for me! There were 20 blooms all together and the rest will be blooming this week. The plant is about 20 years old and we had a hail stomr a couple of minths ago that I thought had ruined it. I think it shocked into blooming! I have another plant that has 8 buds on it also. I am just sorry that most people won't come see it because they think it's too late! I told them I could take all the pictures in the world, but couldn't capture the smell which is so wonderful! Would love to share some pics with you!

 
At 7:29 PM, Blogger Toadly Cereus said...

That would be awsome if we could capture the fragrance along with the amazing blooms. now that would be to die for, eea? But then there would be nothing left to the imagination... THank you again for sharing your beautiful Photos!

 
At 3:59 AM, Anonymous tony said...

DEAR MR FOVELL I HAVE CACTUS OR CEREUS THAT BLOOMS AT NIGHT. BUT THEY ONLY LAST FOR ONE NIGHT. THEY OPEN THEN CLOSE AND DIE. IS THIS NORMAL? I LIVE IN RANCHO CUCAMONGA AND FROM WHAT I HAVE FOUND ON THE WEB THIS IS THE WRONG TIME OF YEAR FOR BLOOMS.I HAVE A NEW BLOOM STARTING.IS THERE ANY THING I CAN DO TO MAKE THEM LAST LONGER?THX TONY(floatinphat@hotmail.com)

 
At 7:32 AM, Blogger Robert Fovell said...

Tony,

While there are a few plants that produce similar blooms which either open/persist during day or last more than a few hours, my plant -- and presumably yours -- is not like that. My plant's flowers open after dusk, and close either just after or just before sunrise. I'm not botanist, but I don't know why this plant even bothers to produce flowers at all... mine has never generated any seeds. It propagates by pushing up new stalks, cretaing new "colonies".

 
At 6:59 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I happen to have a night blooming cereus that a friend gave me many years ago. It came from her mother plant who past away some 20 years ago. What I can tell you to make another plant pull the leaves off and stick them in some dirt about a 1/3 into the soil. It will not have a bloom for four years. The soil need to have some sand mixed in with it.I truly enjoyed your pictures, this is truly an amusing plant and have often thought about getting rid of it because it does look real good, but the bloom are so great and so is the smell. my email rozcollier@bellsouth.net Thanks for the pictures they were fantastic

 
At 7:50 PM, Blogger Tobey Shepherd said...

HI!! I love your cereus blooms! Mine bloomed the night before last....I have posted some of my favorite photos on my blog .the bloom, as always was gorgeous and I took a ton of pictures!! Mine usually only blooms once a year, one bloom. This year it was a rather small bloom.....if I notice it is going to open and shut out all the lights in the sunroom (where it lives) and the dining room, it will open up a lot larger.....It is an indoor plant, seeing as I live in Rockport MA and it is way too cold for it to be outdoors....I am planning on transplanting it now that it has bloomed for the year.....

I got my plant as a cutting from my neighbor shortly after we bought the inn....her plant was from a cutting of a plant that belonged to the mother of a previous owner of our inn, the original plant would be quite old by now, as that would have been back in the 80s...I have had mine since about 2003 I think...

I think it is fun seeing everyone else's photos of their blooms! Thanks for all the info and gorgeous photos...I use a Canon digital...and have been playing aorund with some of the various settings....

my blog is www.lindentreeinn.blogspot.com...

 
At 8:56 PM, Blogger Toadly Cereus said...

Hi. I am Martha west and I have a blog called Toadly Cereus, I have been sick this last week but I went out to check my green house and plants today 9/6/08 and I had a wonderful surprise!! My plants are going to bloom again!! I will take some pictures tomarrow I hope, pneumonia is not fun. first time I have had it. Thats they joy of worken outside and coming into AC. My plans I have had since 1977 and I dont remeber them ever blooming twice in one year. I have counted 6 this time but I didnt go in side. I am really surprised. good night all. martha@pavlas.com

 
At 10:42 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have a cereus that was in my grandmothers house in the '50s.
I take cuttings for friends and family. I have been surprised to hear that everyone thinks that these plants have to be a few years old before they bloom. I take cuttings in the fall, place them in a vase and roots grow during the winter. I plant them in the spring. They always thrive and grow quickly: three to four feet by blooming time. They always have multiple blooms that first year.

 
At 5:53 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Re: Why should they even bother to bloom (when they grow so easily)? The answer lies in their native habitat, perched high in the crooks of trees where there is little substrate and few nutrients. They really can produce seed, if you happen to have night flying moths around to fertilize them! The seeds are then carried by tree dwelling creatures (birds, etc) to new potential real estate opportunities. I'm no botanist either (merely an avid reader); but presumably this is also what led this cactus to wind up living in a tree? What a study in adaptation!

 
At 9:12 AM, Anonymous Ellen said...

I'm in the midwest so have had an indoor plant. It bloomed for me on family birthdays too. A great surprise fregerance when you aren't expecting it.Is it related to the Easter lily in the fregerance? This first one finally died and I just replaced it through Woman's Day Mag. purchase a year or so ago. I have it in bright sun as I saw them growing in Hawaii on a hill in the bright sun. What is the recommended fertilizer and "force blooming" techniques besides being pot-bound you have used?
neep840@gmail.com

 
At 2:32 PM, Anonymous landscaping trees said...

There are many plants that can be grown in these wetlands like: red maple, silver maple, carpinus carolianiana, quercus phellos etc. No matter which plant you grow, they will definitely serve the purpose of enriching the natural environment and maintaining the ecological balance. The only thing to be kept in mind is that, you must take the proper guidance and also see with what is your aim of doing the plantation. native plants tree nursery

 
At 12:30 PM, Blogger VĂ©rone said...

Magnifique Epiphyllum !!!
;-)

 

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